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What’s in a Name? MLB All-Star Analysis Part 1

The MLB All-Star game is coming up soon, so I thought I’d toss a few random analyses your way to commemorate the occasion.  Here’s one…

lastnames

So you want to be an All-Star, do ya?  Then change your name to Rodriguez or Robinson.  Here are the surnames of the top 250 All-Stars, by number of All-Star game selections, going back to the dawn of the All-Star game, in 1933 Chicago.  Unfortunately, notable baseball fan Al Capone was probably not in attendance, since he had other commitments at the time in the Big House.  But I digress.  The bigger and bolder the name, the more someone with that name appeared in an All-Star uniform.   This fine graphic represents the intersection of baseball and big data. For example, Robinson refers to the Orioles’ immortal third baseman, Brooks Robinson (18 career All-Star games), Frank Robinson, player-manager for my beloved Tribe despite those gawd-awful red uniforms (14 career selections), Eddie Robinson, who represented the White Sox and Twins in 4 contests, and of course Jackie Robinson, with 6 games as a Brooklyn Dodger. Frank Robinson was an All-Star selection for 3 of the 4 teams he played for in his career–Cincinnati, Baltimore, and LA. He never made it to the All-Star game as an Indian. Of course. All of the Robinsons on this list are in Cooperstown. Rodriguez is attached to Alex, Ivan, Ellie, Francisco, and Henry.

The word cloud was created using the R wordcloud, tm, and rColorBrewer packages.  The simple R script and data file can be found at https://github.com/dino-fire/allstar-analysis.

Like all of this and my upcoming All-Star analysis, a huge shout-out goes to the data geniuses at Baseball Reference.  More baseball statistics than are fit for human consumption.   This blog has been cross-posted to the most excellent R-bloggers site as well.